Circadian clock and the brain

Sleep Better – Part 3

(Excerpt #3 from 17 Proven Tips to Sleep Better at Night)

Research shows that poor sleep has immediate negative effects on your hormones, exercise performance and brain function.

It can also cause weight gain and increase disease risk in both adults and children.

In contrast, good sleep can help you eat less, exercise better and be healthier.

A good night’s sleep is just as important as regular exercise and a healthy diet.

If you want to optimize your health or lose weight, then getting a good night’s sleep is one of the most important things you can do.

Here are 2 more evidence-based tips to sleep better at night.

Try to Sleep and Wake at Consistent Times

Your body’s circadian rhythm functions on a set loop, aligning itself with sunrise and sunset.

Being consistent with your sleep and waking times can aid long-term sleep quality.

One study noted that participants who had irregular sleeping patterns and went to bed late on the weekends reported poor sleep.

Other studies have highlighted that irregular sleep patterns can alter your circadian rhythm and levels of melatonin, which signal your brain to sleep.

If you struggle with sleep, try to get in the habit of waking up and going to bed at similar times. After several weeks, you may not even need an alarm.

SUMMARY

Try to get into a regular sleep/wake cycle — especially on the weekends. If possible, try to wake up naturally at a similar time every day.

Take a Melatonin Supplement

Melatonin is a key sleep hormone that tells your brain when it’s time to relax and head to bed.

Melatonin supplements are an extremely popular sleep aid.

Often used to treat insomnia, melatonin may be one of the easiest ways to fall asleep faster.

In one study, 2 mg of melatonin before bed improved sleep quality and energy the next day and helped people fall asleep faster. In another study, half of the group fell asleep faster and had a 15% improvement in sleep quality.

Additionally, no withdrawal effects were reported in either of the above studies.

Melatonin is also useful when traveling and adjusting to a new time zone, as it helps your body’s circadian rhythm return to normal.

In some countries, you need a prescription for melatonin. In others, melatonin is widely available in stores or online. Take around 1–5 mg 30–60 minutes before bed.

Start with a low dose to assess your tolerance, and then increase it slowly as needed. Since melatonin may alter brain chemistry, it is advised that you check with a medical professional before use.

You should also speak with a healthcare provider if you’re thinking about using melatonin as a sleep aid for your child, as long-term use of this supplement in children has not been well studied.

SUMMARY

A melatonin supplement is an easy way to improve sleep quality and fall asleep faster. Take 1–5 mg around 30–60 minutes before heading to bed.

Should you be interested in melatonin as an aid for sleeping, kindly take a look at Sleep Spray. It has 5mg of melatonin as well as GABA and Valerian root, and it is easier and more effective to use than a pill! (My recommendation is to get both Sleep and Shield!)

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